Poetry by Holly Day

The Horse

there were eventually too many miles between us

to let it die

where it fell. 

 

ironically, because I didn’t kill it

and let it hobble, burdenless, behind me as we traveled

I had a superior traveling companion:

 

one that didn’t interrupt when I spoke

never said anything itself.



The Spider in the Windowsill

It’s tempting to just squish it outright but you should first

pull off a leg, then another. First an arachnid

then an arthropod then a quadruped then a biped. Does

the level of intelligence and/sophistication increase or decrease

with each removed limb? How about if you

put a hat on the tiny, flailing insect,

give it a cane, make it dance on its two remaining legs 

as it fumbles its way to death?

 

What happens if you remove all the legs 

from one side, but leave the other intact?

does it run around and around

in a circle like a cartoon character, 

a teeny tiny motorcar? Now what happens

when you give it a hat, a cane,

from the first exercise?



Laundry Day

I wake to find that the vampire

has done my laundry, and he has turned

everything pink. There are crumbled bits of bone

trapped in the wrinkles in my sheets

smooth and white like chunks of St. Petersburg marble. 

 

He seems so proud of himself, that he’s done my laundry 

all by himself

(and without me even asking!)

that I pretend to be pleased with my pink sheets, 

my pink clothes. I wonder

what he put in the wash to make everything turn so pink—

a red sock, a potholder, a cat

another woman

 

I think about asking, but I

don’t want to know.

 

 

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Holly Day was born in Hereford, Texas, “The Town Without a Toothache.” She and her family currently live in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where she teaches writing classes at the Loft Literary Center. Her published books include the nonfiction titles, "Music Theory for Dummies", "Music Composition for Dummies", and "Guitar All-in-One for Dummies." Her poetry books include “Late-Night Reading for Hardworking Construction Men” (The Moon Publishing) and “The Smell of Snow” (ELJ Publications).